Why is it “sometimes” good to be an idiot? (Lessons I learned from the 3 Idiots)

3 idiots ass

Few days ago, I slept half past eleven in the evening to finish watching the recent movie recommendation from my hubby – 3 Idiots.  Actually, my hubby recommended it few months ago but I didn’t bother giving time to watch a movie about idiots.  Such a waste of time, I thought!

After watching the movie, I realized that I did waste time – I wasted time for not watching it few months ago.  The movie taught me a lot of fantastic life lessons that I will never learn in a conformist society that we are living in.  The movie also taught me how to face life with an unorthodox and positive mindset.  I won’t tell much of the story as I encourage you to see it for yourself.  The movie is too beautiful to be narrated only in writing.  Though, I’m giving here five reasons why it is “sometimes” good to be an idiot.

Reason #1:  Idiots believe that learning is more important than the degree.   This is especially true for Rancho, which I will not elaborate as this is one of the highlights of the movie.

How often do you meet people who brag about the diplomas and the degrees they earned from the Harvards of the world?  Some people believe that the degree that they earned, the perfect scores they got in college, and the medals and trophies define who they are.  How many of your high school or college classmates who failed in Algebra became top salesmen or successful entrepreneurs?  How many of your classmates who belong to the Achievers’   Club now work in a big company living paycheck to paycheck, driving a company-owned (not his own) car, relying on the company’s heath benefits for the family’s medication, or working abroad away from his/her loved ones to make ends meet?

Our society puts too much pressure on education that it is focused on getting good grades, getting high scores on entrance exams, being the number one in the class, etc. that we fail to focus more on learning.  Idiots think differently.  It doesn’t matter if they get kicked-out for their stupidity from a class, it doesn’t matter if they don’t get the top spot in the class.  Because, for idiots , learning is not limited to memorizing textbook meanings.

Reason #2:  Idiots challenge the conventional.  Idiots ride a different train – they take a different path, they  do things differently.  Idiots prefer simple terms not because their brains cannot comprehend complicated definitions.  It’s because they avoid complexity.

virus 3 idiots

Idiots are advocates of change.  Rancho had countless unpleasant encounters and arguments with Albert Einstein look-a-like – ICE’s Director Viru Sahasrabuddhe (a.k.a. Virus).  One of which is when Rancho challenged  Virus and told him that he is not comfortable on having the grades of the students posted because it publicizes the students’ weaknesses.  As you watch the movie you will witness more funny encounters between Virus and Rancho.

Reason #3:  Idiots value their family that they are on their topmost priority (sometimes, next to their dreams).  Raju, the family’s only hope to have a better life, is motivated to be an engineer in order to buy a car which they will use as dowry so her sister can get married, to buy medicines for his paralyzed father, and to serve decent food on their dining table.

I admire Rancho when he said, “There is only one dad, there are lots of exams.”  For the idiots, it doesn’t matter if they fail to attend a class or take an exam as long as they can take care of a father who just had a near-death experience.  Indeed, it is true that we only have one family, while everything else has duplicates.

Most employees – janitors, service crews, factory workers, managers, supervisors, division heads, alike spend more time in their workplace.  They only stop for short vacations or holidays, or whenever they or a family member are sick, or whenever a love one died.  Sad, but nothing stops us from working.  We are like machines who can’t afford to pause and to take time to walk in a park or play with our toddlers because we are too busy with too many things.  We fail to realize that the company where we are working at can immediately terminate, suspend or replace us, while our special place in the hearts of our loved ones is irreplaceable.

Reason #4:  Idiots become what they want to be.  They follow their passion in choosing their profession.  They are not enslaved by somebody else’s dreams.  Take for example Farhan who pursued his dream of becoming a wildlife photographer against his father’s will who want him to become an engineer.

We owe it to ourselves to pursue our passion.  A lot of books nowadays encourage us to follow our passion and capitalize from it.  There is nothing more rewarding than living a life free from pretensions.  Life is too short to be spent on living other people’s (parents included) dreams.  That is why it is repeatedly mentioned in the movie that you don’t chase your dreams, because if you work with passion, success will come to you.

Reason #5:  Idiots are courageous human beings.  I can never forget how Rancho taught Raju and Farhan what to do whenever faced with problems.  He told them:

“The heart scares easily.  When you have a problem, take your hand, put it over your heart and say, “Aal izz well (All isall is well photoJPG - 3 Idiots well).”

According to Rancho, that simple gesture doesn’t actually solve the problem but it gives them courage to face their problems.  I tried this simple gesture myself (Haha!).  Indeed, it gave me an unusual strength and courage to face life’s challenges.  So, when I faced with fears, I simply tell myself ,”All is well.”

The 3 Idiots are Actually Smart

The 3 Idiots is the kind of movie I will watch over and over again without getting bored.  This movie is full of wit and rich in life lessons.  It is a must watch movie for parents and senior high school students who are still making up their mind on what course to take in college.

I realized, these idiots are no idiots at all.

Embracing an idiot side of me,
Mumay

Life Values I Learned from Coach Carter

 Just last week, I got the luxury of time to watch a really inspirational movie about discipline, motivation, and passion for one’s craft.  While my hubby and son are both fast asleep, there I was awake until twelve midnight watching the movie on my mobile phone.  So, what’s so intriguing about this movie.
 
 
The Story
Coach Carter was released in year 2005.  The story started when Ken Carter took over the coaching job for the Oilers basketball team at Richmond Highschool, where he used to study and play, with unbeaten records, during his younger years.  The team members lack discipline, motivation, and self-respect which is evident on their constant losses.  Ken did not just mentored them on the sports he love, but coached them also on life – living a life of purpose and with decency.  At the start of his coaching job, he offered them a contract that spells a lot of requirements such as the players should sit in front of the class, maintain decent grades and render time for community service apart from the strenuous basketball practice.
 
  
 
 
Essential Values in Life
Throughout the story, he taught five important values that changed the lives of his students forever:  Discipline, Respect, Teamwork, Courage, and Humility.
 
Value #1:  Discipline
Ken Carter stood firm despite the objections of everyone (e.g. parents, school staff) on how harsh his rules are.  Even if a lot of people misunderstood him, he still insisted on getting the progress reports of the players to ensure that they do not flounder academically.  Aside from that Ken, imposed on “suicide” and “push-up” to penalize those who report late for practice and those with rude behaviors. A suicide is a running drill while touching down the court in intervals until the exercise is completed on both sides of the court.  While push-up “is a conditioning exercise performed in a prone position by raising and lowering the body with the straightening and bending of the arms while keeping the back straight and supporting the body on the hands and toes” according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
 
Value #2:  Respect
When Ken Carter first met the players, he called them “Sir” which is too unusual as they are not used to being called “Sir.”  With their recent losses, they have low self-esteem as much as they have low self-respect and respect with their teammates.  However, according to Ken, he will call them “Sir” as long as they have not lost his respect for them.  Later in the story, the players developed a sense of self-respect and earned the respect of other people around them.
 
Value #3:  Teamwork
When Timo Cruz decided to rejoin the team, he was penalized with unreasonable numbers of suicides and push-ups on the courtside while his teammates are practicing.  The entire team witnessed how he persevered and pushed himself to the limits that they volunteered to do the other push-ups and suicides just to have him on the team again.
 
Value #4:  Courage
What is your deepest fear?  This is the question Ken Carter often asks his players.  The question that irritates most of the proud players.  At the climax of the story, when gym’s lockout was ended, Ken Carter found the players studying at the basketball court. Here, Timo Cruz answered the question their often asks them.
 
“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine as children do. It’s not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own lights shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
 
A scene at the gym, from the movie “Coach Carter”
 
Value #5:  Humility
Drowned with constant winnings on their basketball games, the players became too proud that they started trash talking during their games.  Such attitude was immediately corrected by Ken Carter.  Though the movie did not end the way typical a storybook ends, Ken Carter’s message to the team is moving:.
 
“…you men played like champions.  You never gave up.  And champions hold their heads high.  What you achieved goes way beyond the win-loss column or what’s gonna be written on the front page of the sports section tomorrow.  You’ve achieved something that some people spend their whole lives trying to find.  What you achieved is that ever-elusive victory within.  And, gentlemen… I am so proud of you.  Four months ago, when I took the job at Richmond, I had a plan.  That plan failed.  I came to coach basketball players, and you became students.  I came to teach boys, and you became men.  And for that, I thank you:.
 
It’s Not All About Winning
At the end of every battle, of every game, of every story, there is a realization that winning is not the highest peak of our lives.  Indeed, the victory, the win, the reward motivates us through the challenges in our journey.  It is the journey itself – the realization of one’s strength on momentary setbacks, the courage gathered amidst the perplexities, and the winning spirit developed within yourself by simply having an end in mind.
 

Life Values I Learned from Coach Carter

 Just last week, I got the luxury of time to watch a really inspirational movie about discipline, motivation, and passion for one’s craft.  While my hubby and son are both fast asleep, there I was awake until twelve midnight watching the movie on my mobile phone.  So, what’s so intriguing about this movie.
 
 
The Story
Coach Carter was released in year 2005.  The story started when Ken Carter took over the coaching job for the Oilers basketball team at Richmond Highschool, where he used to study and play, with unbeaten records, during his younger years.  The team members lack discipline, motivation, and self-respect which is evident on their constant losses.  Ken did not just mentored them on the sports he love, but coached them also on life – living a life of purpose and with decency.  At the start of his coaching job, he offered them a contract that spells a lot of requirements such as the players should sit in front of the class, maintain decent grades and render time for community service apart from the strenuous basketball practice.
 
  
 
 
Essential Values in Life
Throughout the story, he taught five important values that changed the lives of his students forever:  Discipline, Respect, Teamwork, Courage, and Humility.
 
Value #1:  Discipline
Ken Carter stood firm despite the objections of everyone (e.g. parents, school staff) on how harsh his rules are.  Even if a lot of people misunderstood him, he still insisted on getting the progress reports of the players to ensure that they do not flounder academically.  Aside from that Ken, imposed on “suicide” and “push-up” to penalize those who report late for practice and those with rude behaviors. A suicide is a running drill while touching down the court in intervals until the exercise is completed on both sides of the court.  While push-up “is a conditioning exercise performed in a prone position by raising and lowering the body with the straightening and bending of the arms while keeping the back straight and supporting the body on the hands and toes” according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
 
Value #2:  Respect
When Ken Carter first met the players, he called them “Sir” which is too unusual as they are not used to being called “Sir.”  With their recent losses, they have low self-esteem as much as they have low self-respect and respect with their teammates.  However, according to Ken, he will call them “Sir” as long as they have not lost his respect for them.  Later in the story, the players developed a sense of self-respect and earned the respect of other people around them.
 
Value #3:  Teamwork
When Timo Cruz decided to rejoin the team, he was penalized with unreasonable numbers of suicides and push-ups on the courtside while his teammates are practicing.  The entire team witnessed how he persevered and pushed himself to the limits that they volunteered to do the other push-ups and suicides just to have him on the team again.
 
Value #4:  Courage
What is your deepest fear?  This is the question Ken Carter often asks his players.  The question that irritates most of the proud players.  At the climax of the story, when gym’s lockout was ended, Ken Carter found the players studying at the basketball court. Here, Timo Cruz answered the question their often asks them.
 
“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine as children do. It’s not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own lights shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
 
A scene at the gym, from the movie “Coach Carter”
 
Value #5:  Humility
Drowned with constant winnings on their basketball games, the players became too proud that they started trash talking during their games.  Such attitude was immediately corrected by Ken Carter.  Though the movie did not end the way typical a storybook ends, Ken Carter’s message to the team is moving:.
 
“…you men played like champions.  You never gave up.  And champions hold their heads high.  What you achieved goes way beyond the win-loss column or what’s gonna be written on the front page of the sports section tomorrow.  You’ve achieved something that some people spend their whole lives trying to find.  What you achieved is that ever-elusive victory within.  And, gentlemen… I am so proud of you.  Four months ago, when I took the job at Richmond, I had a plan.  That plan failed.  I came to coach basketball players, and you became students.  I came to teach boys, and you became men.  And for that, I thank you:.
 
It’s Not All About Winning
At the end of every battle, of every game, of every story, there is a realization that winning is not the highest peak of our lives.  Indeed, the victory, the win, the reward motivates us through the challenges in our journey.  It is the journey itself – the realization of one’s strength on momentary setbacks, the courage gathered amidst the perplexities, and the winning spirit developed within yourself by simply having an end in mind.